Excerpt from BBC

There are no resorts, no beaches, no amenities, and its contribution to the national GDP is practically zero. Yet the mile-long rocky isle of Redonda in the Caribbean Sea is deemed one of the most valuable spots in the region.

Virtually untouched by humans for centuries, Antigua and Barbuda’s lesser-known third island has long been a key nesting site for migrating birds from across the world and home to wildlife found nowhere else on Earth.

When environmentalists first touted the idea of entirely removing thousands of invasive black rats and a herd of feral goats threatening this wildlife, it seemed ambitious at best.

Fast forward five years and uninhabited Redonda’s once barren terrain is today a fertile eco haven, teeming with fresh new vegetation while populations of birds and endemic lizards have soared.

‘Stark contrast’

Work began in 2016 but the project’s real success was only revealed recently when conservationists made their first trip back in 18 months.

Shanna Challenger, of the country’s Environmental Awareness Group (EAG) which undertook the work alongside the government and international agencies, says it was an “emotional moment”.

“It was such a stark contrast from the first time I saw Redonda in 2016 when it was literally crumbling into the sea,” she recalls.

Leave a Reply

ALMOST THERE! PLEASE ENTER YOUR EMAIL TO VIEW THE RECORDING

Privacy Policy: We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

Join The Island Innovation Community!

This occasional newsletter highlights events and stories about innovation in sustainable development for rural, remote and island regions. We want to change the discourse to demonstrate how islandness can be a driver for innovation.